When someone copies your tattoo

Recently I was alerted by my tattooist that one of my tattoos had been copied and inked onto someone else.

I know that with social media nothing is sacred. Yes, if I post pictures of all my tattoos, others will see the design and want it for themselves. But this shouldn’t stop tattooists from advertising their work and customers celebrating their new tattoo.

The copy on the left and my original on the right

It should be up to the tattooist to either out-right refuse to tattoo a direct copy or create a piece inspired by the said design. Then both people get a custom and unique tattoo. Tattooists must have some sort of responsibility to their clients and respect for other tattooists not to steal their work.

I suppose copying is the highest form of flattery and in some ways it is a compliment that someone liked the tattoo so much that they wanted it, but that doesn’t mean you should get it.

The tattoo in question is one of the few ones on my body that has a real significant meaning, it goes with one my boyfriend has to mark our five-year anniversary. I have a watermelon slice and he has a whole watermelon with a slice missing. Yes it’s silly but it means a lot to us.

This isn’t the only issue, the tattoo is badly done, and perhaps something that the wearer may come to regret.

Also what about the tattooists? Sophie who created the original has had her work stolen and the one who tattooed the copy is re-creating work that isn’t original. They aren’t creating a name or style of their own.

Nonethless I still love my tattoo just the same and I know that I have the original and the better tattoo.

I know for sure that I’m not the only one that this has happened to. Have you had a tattoo copied?

- DEFINITION OF FLASH- from Salon Serpent
“Flash is a number of designs, specifically made for tattoo purposes, placed together on a sheet of paper. Usually they are made in a set of multiple sheets. Meant to hang on the walls of tattoo shops, to be picked from by customers and tattooed. (not every painting by a tattoo-artist is flash and sometimes even unsuitable, because not specifically made to use as such) As with all (art)work, flash has copyright. Buying a set of flash gives you the right to use this flash for tattoos. It can, however, not be used for any other commercial or otherwise purposes then tattooing.”

Custom work is different, it is designed by the artist for that customer and should not be copied.

Kendra Morris

New-York based singer-songwriter Kendra Morris is set to release her new single a quirky cover of The Proclaimers ‘I’m Gonna Be’ (500 miles) out on 15th September. She has been likened to Amy Winehouse with her soulful vocals and rock ‘n’ roll style.

Kendra is a tattoo enthusiast and her right arm is inked with perfectly perched birds. Her body art relates to her strong love of taxidermy which can be found in her home.

 The first bird I got was a long time ago. Birds retain their voices when they sing. They are all so individual. There’s no one bird that’s the same as another bird. It’s just been an attachment. Then I got nine birds on my chest. I have this crazy apartment that’s like an enchanted forest. I have taxidermy everywhere. - Kendra Morris in Interview Magazine

Flower Tattoos

As summertime draws to a close we wanted to celebrate the glorious weather we’ve had with our pick of flower tattoos. We’d love to see yours!

@astonzx

@harrietheathtattoo

@eltattoo

@goksisdead

@missverityann

@hannahpixiesnow

@mrcoffeybean

@tillydee

@alextat283

@kerste_tattoos

@derickmontez_

@philgarcia805

 

Sailor Jerry’s tattooed Ambassador EmmaLi

EmmaLi Stenhouse, 29, from Hastings, UK, talks rum, Sailor Jerry and shows us her tattoo collection

What do you do for a living? I am currently the UK Ambassador for Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum.

Fly Lightly My Heart by Ben Davies

 

Fly Lightly My Heart by Ben Davies

 

 

How did you get into being an Ambassador and what exactly does it entail? Are tattoos a part of this? 

I guess it was all down to being at the right place at the time and maybe a little luck. I went from managing bars in Hastings to setting up my own Tiki Bar, Huny Lu Lu’s. One day, completely on the off chance, someone from Sailor Jerry came into the bar and said that they were looking for an Ambassador and thought it would be worth me applying. I thought I’d be brave and give it a go as there was nothing to lose, so sent in my CV, got an interview and to cut a long story short, got the job. They wanted someone who was into rum and tattoos, which sums me up as I’ve always been genuinely passionate about both. My time is split between talking to bartenders, organising events and trying to educate people about Sailor Jerry.

On EmmaLi's legs by  Alexis Camburn-Cox On EmmaLi’s legs by Alexis Camburn-Cox

 

How different was being a bartender that to what you do now? 

I travel a lot more now and am rarely at home – my days are completely varied. One day I could be at a tattoo convention or throwing a party, and the next I’m in the office planning the next event or doing a training session at a bar. The variety means I’ve had the chance to meet some amazing people and travel about a lot. I do love bartending and I still miss it loads, so it is nice to still be involved in the industry without having to be on the front line, which, trust me, can be really hard. I don’t think we really appreciate how hard bartenders work or what we have to put up with – anyone who’s ever worked in a bar will know what I’m talking about. Saying that, I still get the chance to stay pretty close to the bartending side of things, as Sailor Jerry is always keen to find a way to support bartenders. For example, we’re currently running a campaign to get “Bartender Appreciation Day” recognised as a national holiday within the UK. It’s nice to have the opportunity to reward those hardworking guys and gals who make our good nights out possible whilst dealing with all the bad and the ugly!

By Madame Butterfly

 

Can you give us a bit of a rundown of your tattoo collection?

 I was 18 when I got my first tattoo at Madame Butterfly’s in Hastings. I started with my ankles, and then moved onto the “True Love” roses on my feet.  I worked my way up to the backs of my legs and hips, then my ribs and stomach.  I accidentally got most of my painful bits out of the way early, which I’m now pretty glad about. I wanted to save space for the places that would be more on show until I found the right pieces. I’m slowly but surely adding to my collection, and now that I’m 29 I know what I like, and I’m confident my mind won’t change too drastically. I’ve recently started getting serious on my arms and adding to my back.

I’ve always loved traditional tattoos and was probably influenced by Sailor Jerry before I even knew who Norman Collins was. I love the romanticism and hope that his tattoos portray. The messaging behind them evokes a strong sense of telling a story and holding on to a memory which I love. For me, Sailor Jerry tattoos are as timeless and relevant today as they were back in the day.

Love it or leave it by Alexis Camburn-Cox

 

Ladies and lower butterflies by Rebecca Butterfly – Neck by Alexis Camburn-Cox

 

What are your favourite pieces and why?

 My arms are definitely my favourite pieces at the moment because I’m still excited about adding to them. The peacock is one I particularly love and is done by Caleb Kilby at Shangri-La, someone who I have known for a long time and despite it not being my usual style, means a lot to me. I love his style. Some of my other arm was done by Alex Bage, whose style I adore so I was lucky enough to catch him twice. Other pieces I’ll always love are probably my feet and my ribs, which I love as much now as when they were new, in fact I don’t regret any of my tattoos. I’m really lucky to have the opportunity to meet a lot of amazing artists doing what I do, so I’m trying to build up my collection on my travels.  

Peacock by Caleb Kilby

 

Fat Panda by Alex Bage

 

What do you think your tattoos say about you? 

I dread to think! Personally, I think they bring out the hopeless romantic in me. I love tattoos on women, but for me, keeping them classic and feminine softens the edginess of having quite a lot of tattoos.

By Alex Bage

 

What else is in the pipeline for you this year? Work and tattoo wise.

 I will be busy running the campaign for Bartender Appreciation Day, so get voting! We’ve got a few big events coming up which are definitely keeping me busy, and I’ll no doubt be hanging around in bars across the city! With regards to tattoos, I’ll definitely be getting some more work done on my arms and I’m planning on getting to work on my shoulders next.

By Aracelli 4Eva

 

Last but not least, a quick cocktail our readers can make at home? 

Heavy Punch – it’s a great summer cocktail which is refreshingly fruity and easy to mix at home.

HEAVY PUNCH RECIPE

Ingredients:
1 ½ parts Sailor Jerry Spiced
1 part pineapple juice
½ part port
½ part simple syrup
½ part fresh lime juice
4 dashes of bitters

Method: Combine ingredients, shake and strain over crushed ice. Garnish with fresh grated nutmeg.

Respect his legacy, drink responsibly  

 

 

 

the heartwork exhibition

For one night only Digimem Studio in Coventry showcased The Heartwork Exhibition. Curated by Jessica Gough, the exhibition showed art work from female tattooists and artists, accompanied by wine and home-made cupcakes.

@jessicacrows

@claralouise0711

@hananqattan

@donna.infinite.ink

@paintedpainter

@paintedladytattoo

@ardentshadows

@karmacollectiveuk

@annabel_leigh

 

 

 

The art of HANDIEDAN

Dutch artist Handiedan creates beautiful hand-cut collages inspired by traditional imagery drawing upon vintage female pin-ups. Handiedan collects the vintage frames herself to house her computer montage and scuptural collages.

The classic pin-up body parts are collected from old playing cards, antique sheet music, stamps and ornaments and laid over baroque and Victorian backdrops.

View more artwork at www.handiedan.com

The Expose Project

Activist blogger Jes Baker creator of The Militant Baker teamed up with photographer Liora K to create The Expose Project. An incredible collection of photographs proudly showcasing women, as they really are. Un-Photoshoped, un-airbrushed and unbelievably beautiful.

Women you wouldn’t normally see on billboards or adverts. Women just like you, with bodies likes yours, with scars, stretch marks, cellulite- everything we are told to hide. Undressed and baring all these women showed the world that they are more than enough!

When was the last time you opened up your browser and saw a beautiful image of a body shape that looked just like yours?

Jes Baker

 

 

To see more photographs that celebrate the female body go to www.theexposeproject.com

Jes Baker quoted from her blog

Lady Tattooers

With the recent launch of Lady Tattooers, a website dedicated to showcasing some incredible work from female tattooers around the world, we spoke with one of the website’s curators Betty Rose to find out all about the site, how tattooists can get involved and of course her own tattoo career.

My name is Betty Rose and I’m a Brooklyn-based tattoo artist and painter at Eight of Swords Tattoo in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. My career began with an apprenticeship in 2004 and after eight years of working at a studio in Manhattan, I left NYC to travel for a year. Returning in 2013, I took up residency at Eight of Swords Tattoo.

I enjoy travelling for work, but after doing it for a year I decided to take a break from anything too far out of the way.  My next foray will be the Westchester Tattoo Convention in October.

 

What inspired you to become a tattooist? What draws you to tattoos?

What originally inspired me to create tattoos was my years as a punk rock kid. When I was growing up I bounced around schools and had trouble making friends. The first group that I felt at home with were these punk-rock/skater kids I met in Junior High, who helped me to see how tattoos were both a way of expressing myself and taking the things I cared about with me everywhere I went. A few years later, I got my first sleeve and I started to realize that I wanted to be the girl holding the machine, not just the girl getting tattooed.

What was your first tattoo?

The first tattoo I got was a small fairy on my forearm based off a pair of earrings my mother had from the 60s.
What is the Lady Tattooers website and what does it hope to do?
When did you launch the website and Instagram?

Lady Tattooers is an inspirational art platform focused on promoting the top female tattoo artists. We maintain a list of tattooers curated by myself and a few friends. There are so many talented artists around the world and we plan to make people aware of who they are and how to find them. Our goal is to become the online resource for female tattoo art.

Lady Tattooers IG began in 2012, after my husband (Matty) made clear how little he knew about female tattoo artists. I’d always wanted to help spread the passion that started my career in tattooing, so Matty’s bewilderment opened my eyes to a unique opportunity to both do something I loved and give back to the community of female artists that helped pave the way. The website has been an idea we’ve been working on for a while now, but was only officially launched a few weeks ago.

How can tattooists get their work onto the website/Instagram? Can they contact you for an interview?

Typically, I find them while I’m browsing social media or I’ll get introduced to them through someone I’ve featured. Then I’ll take a look at their work, and if I’m excited by it I’ll make a post about them. As far as being contacted for interviews…I happily accept referrals from artists who are already featured, but I’m not comfortable being solicited. The reason for that is because it’s sort of against the spirit of what Lady Tattooers is about. An example would be that I’m comfortable promoting/selling the art of women I post, but I wouldn’t feel the same way if someone paid me to post their work. At the end of the day this is something I do because I truly believe these women are great artists, and I wouldn’t want to continue if it stopped being about that.

How do you decide which women to showcase? What do you hope the future will hold for Lady Tattooer?

The decision on who to showcase is based on a few different factors like talent, experience, etc. No one factor determines the decision; ultimately the decision comes down to what I think. On rare occasions I’ll put a Lady Tattooer to the front of the line because they inspire me on some level, or because I’ve been a fan of their work for a long time.

The future is such a tricky question…we only launched a few weeks ago and our original plan was going to have slow growth over time, but then we found out that people liked what we made. Since then we’ve re-evaluated our plans because of some amazing offers we’ve been getting. In short we don’t know if we’ll be doing anything different or if we’ll be releasing anything new, what you can count on is that we’ll definitely continue to publish posts on amazing Lady Tattooers every week.