Category: Art

Flower Tattoos

As summertime draws to a close we wanted to celebrate the glorious weather we’ve had with our pick of flower tattoos. We’d love to see yours!

@astonzx

@harrietheathtattoo

@eltattoo

@goksisdead

@missverityann

@hannahpixiesnow

@mrcoffeybean

@tillydee

@alextat283

@kerste_tattoos

@derickmontez_

@philgarcia805

 

Sailor Jerry’s tattooed Ambassador EmmaLi

EmmaLi Stenhouse, 29, from Hastings, UK, talks rum, Sailor Jerry and shows us her tattoo collection

What do you do for a living? I am currently the UK Ambassador for Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum.

Fly Lightly My Heart by Ben Davies

 

Fly Lightly My Heart by Ben Davies

 

 

How did you get into being an Ambassador and what exactly does it entail? Are tattoos a part of this? 

I guess it was all down to being at the right place at the time and maybe a little luck. I went from managing bars in Hastings to setting up my own Tiki Bar, Huny Lu Lu’s. One day, completely on the off chance, someone from Sailor Jerry came into the bar and said that they were looking for an Ambassador and thought it would be worth me applying. I thought I’d be brave and give it a go as there was nothing to lose, so sent in my CV, got an interview and to cut a long story short, got the job. They wanted someone who was into rum and tattoos, which sums me up as I’ve always been genuinely passionate about both. My time is split between talking to bartenders, organising events and trying to educate people about Sailor Jerry.

On EmmaLi's legs by  Alexis Camburn-Cox On EmmaLi’s legs by Alexis Camburn-Cox

 

How different was being a bartender that to what you do now? 

I travel a lot more now and am rarely at home – my days are completely varied. One day I could be at a tattoo convention or throwing a party, and the next I’m in the office planning the next event or doing a training session at a bar. The variety means I’ve had the chance to meet some amazing people and travel about a lot. I do love bartending and I still miss it loads, so it is nice to still be involved in the industry without having to be on the front line, which, trust me, can be really hard. I don’t think we really appreciate how hard bartenders work or what we have to put up with – anyone who’s ever worked in a bar will know what I’m talking about. Saying that, I still get the chance to stay pretty close to the bartending side of things, as Sailor Jerry is always keen to find a way to support bartenders. For example, we’re currently running a campaign to get “Bartender Appreciation Day” recognised as a national holiday within the UK. It’s nice to have the opportunity to reward those hardworking guys and gals who make our good nights out possible whilst dealing with all the bad and the ugly!

By Madame Butterfly

 

Can you give us a bit of a rundown of your tattoo collection?

 I was 18 when I got my first tattoo at Madame Butterfly’s in Hastings. I started with my ankles, and then moved onto the “True Love” roses on my feet.  I worked my way up to the backs of my legs and hips, then my ribs and stomach.  I accidentally got most of my painful bits out of the way early, which I’m now pretty glad about. I wanted to save space for the places that would be more on show until I found the right pieces. I’m slowly but surely adding to my collection, and now that I’m 29 I know what I like, and I’m confident my mind won’t change too drastically. I’ve recently started getting serious on my arms and adding to my back.

I’ve always loved traditional tattoos and was probably influenced by Sailor Jerry before I even knew who Norman Collins was. I love the romanticism and hope that his tattoos portray. The messaging behind them evokes a strong sense of telling a story and holding on to a memory which I love. For me, Sailor Jerry tattoos are as timeless and relevant today as they were back in the day.

Love it or leave it by Alexis Camburn-Cox

 

Ladies and lower butterflies by Rebecca Butterfly – Neck by Alexis Camburn-Cox

 

What are your favourite pieces and why?

 My arms are definitely my favourite pieces at the moment because I’m still excited about adding to them. The peacock is one I particularly love and is done by Caleb Kilby at Shangri-La, someone who I have known for a long time and despite it not being my usual style, means a lot to me. I love his style. Some of my other arm was done by Alex Bage, whose style I adore so I was lucky enough to catch him twice. Other pieces I’ll always love are probably my feet and my ribs, which I love as much now as when they were new, in fact I don’t regret any of my tattoos. I’m really lucky to have the opportunity to meet a lot of amazing artists doing what I do, so I’m trying to build up my collection on my travels.  

Peacock by Caleb Kilby

 

Fat Panda by Alex Bage

 

What do you think your tattoos say about you? 

I dread to think! Personally, I think they bring out the hopeless romantic in me. I love tattoos on women, but for me, keeping them classic and feminine softens the edginess of having quite a lot of tattoos.

By Alex Bage

 

What else is in the pipeline for you this year? Work and tattoo wise.

 I will be busy running the campaign for Bartender Appreciation Day, so get voting! We’ve got a few big events coming up which are definitely keeping me busy, and I’ll no doubt be hanging around in bars across the city! With regards to tattoos, I’ll definitely be getting some more work done on my arms and I’m planning on getting to work on my shoulders next.

By Aracelli 4Eva

 

Last but not least, a quick cocktail our readers can make at home? 

Heavy Punch – it’s a great summer cocktail which is refreshingly fruity and easy to mix at home.

HEAVY PUNCH RECIPE

Ingredients:
1 ½ parts Sailor Jerry Spiced
1 part pineapple juice
½ part port
½ part simple syrup
½ part fresh lime juice
4 dashes of bitters

Method: Combine ingredients, shake and strain over crushed ice. Garnish with fresh grated nutmeg.

Respect his legacy, drink responsibly  

 

 

 

the heartwork exhibition

For one night only Digimem Studio in Coventry showcased The Heartwork Exhibition. Curated by Jessica Gough, the exhibition showed art work from female tattooists and artists, accompanied by wine and home-made cupcakes.

@jessicacrows

@claralouise0711

@hananqattan

@donna.infinite.ink

@paintedpainter

@paintedladytattoo

@ardentshadows

@karmacollectiveuk

@annabel_leigh

 

 

 

The art of HANDIEDAN

Dutch artist Handiedan creates beautiful hand-cut collages inspired by traditional imagery drawing upon vintage female pin-ups. Handiedan collects the vintage frames herself to house her computer montage and scuptural collages.

The classic pin-up body parts are collected from old playing cards, antique sheet music, stamps and ornaments and laid over baroque and Victorian backdrops.

View more artwork at www.handiedan.com

The Expose Project

Activist blogger Jes Baker creator of The Militant Baker teamed up with photographer Liora K to create The Expose Project. An incredible collection of photographs proudly showcasing women, as they really are. Un-Photoshoped, un-airbrushed and unbelievably beautiful.

Women you wouldn’t normally see on billboards or adverts. Women just like you, with bodies likes yours, with scars, stretch marks, cellulite- everything we are told to hide. Undressed and baring all these women showed the world that they are more than enough!

When was the last time you opened up your browser and saw a beautiful image of a body shape that looked just like yours?

Jes Baker

 

 

To see more photographs that celebrate the female body go to www.theexposeproject.com

Jes Baker quoted from her blog

Everyone Loves Someone

The Book of Everyone project allows you to create your own personal book for someone special of your choosing. Your one-of-a-kind booked is made by you – and creative and talented artists, illustrators and designers – and filled with interesting art work and imagery, including photos from your own collection.

 Everyone deserves a book with their name on the cover

The Book of Everyone quoted from their Facebook

The short video tells the alternative love story behind tattooing. The film was made by Scottish photographer/director David Boni and was shot in Glasgow, hence the rainy street. The tattoo parlour featured in the film was Fleur De Lis and the soundtrack is by The Mostar Diving Club.

 

The Love Bomb

 

You have got just a few days left to see The “Love Bomb” at Pitfifield, London.

Help spread the love and be part of the ongoing struggle for peace!

We spoke with artist Daisuke Sakaguchi who has collaborated with Wendy Meakin, dealer on C4′s Four Rooms to create The “Love Bomb”. Daisuke painted The “Love Bomb” with traditional Japanese symbols of love.

Daisuke Sakaguchi, 33, Artist and Creative Director of THE 27 LIFE, London. 

How do you know Wendy Meakin? why did you decide to work together on the project? 

I graduated from Central Saint Martins University back in 2003. During my studies, one of my most influential lecturers was Wendy Meakin. I had the choice of having other lecturers, but I stuck with Wendy because I was really drawn to the topics that she covered, but I also loved the way she explained them and the style of her teaching. After I graduated, we stayed in touch and naturally became friends. We worked on a few very interesting projects together, but within the last 11 years we always said we’ll do something major together and the Love Bomb is the result – and just the beginning!

What inspired you to create the Love Bomb?

For me, three-dimensional objects are an extremely fun canvas to paint on. I enjoy studying the original shapes and seeing how I can camouflage certain areas of the object and sometimes enhance and highlight other areas. In my career I have painted on a variety of different objects and the bomb was a great challenge. It is almost like creating a massive back piece or a huge sleeve. Usually I embrace the object that I am painting, however in this case it was almost having have to do the opposite.

 

What is your motivation?

I am against war and that this bomb had no functional use other than a reminder of what it was once used for. Similar bombs like this one, 20,000 of them were dropped on Iraq in One night! Imagine the death count. We wanted to take a symbol of hate and turn into love. We wanted to give her a new life! As an artist I feel like I had the opportunity to resurrect it and turn in to something completely unique. I know that it is an inanimate object, but being a spiritual person I feel like it now has a life and a soul.

What do you hope people will take from this project?

Never stop creating!

What happens now? Is it for sale?

Yes, we’ve had high offers, but we would like it to go to the right buyer and home. Whether it is a single collector or a company, it will be awesome if the Love Bomb’s new placement allows it to be viewed and enjoyed by many others. So we think it will be amazing and look beautiful in an epic foyer of a hotel or office reception.

Will there be future collaborations? 

Maybe “Wendy Meakin and Daisuke THE 27 LIFE Sakaguchi present Love Guns”, or “Love TANK”

 

It is my hope that one will stop and think about bombs, there indiscriminate power and what an efficient killing device humans’ have created, we are in this together. Love and peace require patience, empathy, and the ability to sit and talk with those who have  diametrically opposed ideologies.

Wendy Meakin

WENDYMEAKIN.COM
THE27LIFE.COM
@wendyameakin
@the27life
Photography by William Nelson  

Female Nudes as they really are

Artist Victoria Selbach paints female nudes as they really are – as their bodies truly are in domestic, everyday settings. The women are just that – women, cast free of social projections and celebrity airbrushing.

The human presence stripped bare of pretense and accouterments is simply alive, revealing a deeply personal identity, present in the light of one unique moment.

Victoria Selbach

Quoted from her artistic statement

Images from Huffington Post