Tagged: disney

Briar Rose Tattoo, south London

We couldn’t resist a trip to south London’s Hither Green, when tattoo artist Tiggy Tuppence invited us down to her brand new (and Disney inspired) tattoo studio Briar Rose. It’s the most perfect place to get tattooed and she’s thought of every last detail, including an antler chandelier that reminded of her Beauty and the Beast‘s Gaston… 

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What inspired you to become a tattoo artist? I worked in the games industry, but I hated being in an office environment, it felt static and uncreative. I’d been thinking about tattooing as a career as I felt that it would give me the creative freedom I needed, and the opportunity to be around people I might fit in with more. I had a tattoo artist friend, who told me that it would be too hard, that I’d have to quit my job and work for nothing for years, which was a bit disheartening, so I never felt like I would be good enough  to become a tattoo artist. However, I was offered an apprenticeship by Kamil in north London because he had seen my work and  liked it! That was a huge confidence boost! I quit my main job to pursue tattooing, and  took on a part-time job in GAME to support me. It was the best thing I ever did, and I’m so glad I didn’t give up. 


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Where does your inspiration come from? I’ve had many different creative backgrounds, I grew up sewing with my mother, watching Disney as well as every other cartoon going, and drawing every day for fun. I left school at 16 to do a National Diploma in Fashion Design,  then I went to university to do a degree in computer games design. I’d always wanted to go into concept art for films and games, as this was the sort of art I loved. My drawing style reflects that, my work isn’t typically ‘tattoo-ish’. I’ve always worked digitally, working with a Wacom tablet and Photoshop for the last 14 years, and I love to incorporate all different colours into my work – I love colour! My inspiration comes from this rich background, and my love of cartoons, games, films, digital artists, and traditional artists. 

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What are your favourite subjects to tattoo? I love tattooing cats, animals, nature, flowers, birds, wildlife. Yeah, I really love tattooing cute animals. I grew up in rural west-country so I’ve always been into nature and local wildlife, living in London I miss this aspect of my home so tattooing animals is my happy place. I also love tattooing any sort of pop-culture stuff – Pokemon, Disney, Studio Ghibli, stuff from games like Okami, Portal, and Final Fantasy, and many others too.

Your new studio is “unapologetically Disney inspired”, why did you decide to do this?  I didn’t decide to make my studio Disney inspired, it just happened.  After I came up with the name Briar Rose it just all fell into place. I loved that I was able to come up with an original shop name, and I figured there probably aren’t too many tattoo shops like this. I just buy things as and when I see them, and before you know it I have an entire shop (and home) full of Disney!

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Even down to the antler chandelier, that reminded me of Gaston, the rug in the hallway was inspired by the magic carpet from Aladdin, and the wallpaper in the main studio area made me think of The Jungle Book. It’s not officially Disney but each little element has been inspired by it as that’s just how I am! I really did put my heart and soul into making this place. I’ve got a lot of compliments on it, many of my customers have said they’ve never been in a tattoo shop like it before. I like to think I have something magical here.

Favourite Disney film? Man that is the hardest question and it comes up all the time. I ask most people what theirs is (apparently I attract other Disnerds here too) and then of course I am always asked this question back. Can I give a top 5 in no particular order? Aristocats, Robin Hood, Moana, Sleeping Beauty, and Tarzan! It feels horrible having to choose. I love them all.

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Describe your studio in just three words… Whimsical, Warm, Welcoming

How did you pick the location? What kind of clients do you hope to attract? And what can they expect from their experience? I wanted a shop that was in a safe, friendly area, as I know that many of my customers who are female would have to carry cash with them. I don’t want people to feel like they have to look over their shoulder when finding my shop. I’m in the process of getting a card machine as well, which I hope will help that. Also for first-time customers, who are already feeling nervous, I think it’s just nicer to show up to a place that’s easy to find, and where you feel comfortable. This was really important to me, I want people to have a lovely experience, and then go home and feel like they’re always welcome back, even if it’s just for a chat or a coffee.

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In the studio, I’ve tried to provide all sorts of things to help people feel welcome and looked after, I like to take care of people. I’ve bought all different coffees and teas for my fancy coffee machine, I’ve got phone charging ports in the waiting area, complete with Android/iPhone and USBC cables, there is wifi, customers can choose their own music if they like by playing it through our fancy Sonos speaker. Whatever makes their experience comfortable, as they’re often sitting with me for many hours at a time.

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What has been your most favourite tattoo you have ever created, why? I think the one that takes the top spot will have to be a cat portrait I did. Her cat was called Diamond who had the most impressive resting bitch face, which we managed to capture in the tattoo. As an extra bonus, this girl emailed me after her appointment asking if I’d like to meet up some time, it was the most awesome thing ever and she is now one of my best friends, we talk literally every day. Love you Kerri! 

Tiggy11How do you like to work with your clients? The shop is by appointment only so clients will email me with their ideas and organise a consultation, I think it’s important to get to know your client before drawing something for them, to get those extra personal touches into the design, but I know this isn’t always possible. 

I’ll always draw up my client’s designs before they come in so they can see and make changes, I feel like the work is a collaboration where I’m the art director! But it’s important for people to be able to have some amount of say on what lives on them permanently. I’ve also become friends with quite a large handful of my past clients as well, which is wonderful. This is the best job!

Visit www.briarrosetattoo.com, or follow Tiggy’s studio on Instagram @briarrosetattoo

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Film Review: Kubo and the Two Strings

Hobbyist reviewer Harry Casey-Woodward reviews a cool kid’s movie, the magical epic of Kubo and the Two Strings

Kubo and the Two Strings, 2016, cert PG, dir Travis Knight, 3/5

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The best kid’s films have some basis in the oldest stories. See Disney’s biggest successes for example. So what with a lot of the classic fairy tales having been filmed (or re-filmed in the case of Disney’s recent remakes), it’s always exciting when a new family film comes along based on something that isn’t princesses and palaces.

Enter Kubo and the Two Strings, a dazzling mix of stop motion and computer animation with a story set once upon a time in Japan. I don’t know which parts of the story are based on actual Japanese folklore and which are made up, but the movie has a rather authentic mythic feel even when it’s served with dollops of Disney-style, family-friendly goo.

Kubo is a boy with a rather emo fringe that hides his missing eye. This eye was stolen from him by his grandfather and the film opens with Kubo and his mother fleeing their wicked relatives during a storm. Cut forward a few years and Kubo lives with his mother in a cave just outside of town.

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Kubo spends his time in the town below, entertaining people with violent samurai stories and acting them out with his enchanted origami. He brings the paper to life by playing a two-stringed, guitar-like instrument that is the source of his powers. So he’s having fun, until one day he accidentally stays out too late and his witch-like aunts wearing creepy masks come chasing him. His mother saves him by enchanting his robe to grow wings and carry him away.

He finds himself stuck with a talking monkey (Charlize Theron) who tells him the only way he can be safe is to seek the three powerful objects he told stories about: a sword, a breastplate and a helmet. Kubo finds himself on the quest of his dreams, but it doesn’t come without challenges. However with the help of his origami, his monkey and a new samurai friend cursed into a half-beetle creature (Matthew McConaughy), he gives it a go.

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So as you can see, the plot has some quirky ideas. Who doesn’t love a story of a young boy going on an epic quest with talking animals, fighting monsters with cool weapons in rather impressive action scenes? For kids it’s going to feel like one big video game. It has its soft side too, with a stress on the importance of family and friendship in the face of hardship, that sort of thing.

There are some funny moments too, often at the expense of the monkey which is a slight shame because she’s an awesome character. The beetle samurai reminded me of Kronk from Emperor’s New Groove, which will be good for people who like loveable idiots. The animation isn’t sloppy either and may be the best thing to see this movie for. Slick, colourful and genuinely beautiful in places, this is a feast for the eyes. If you can adjust to Japanese characters speaking in American accents, you should enjoy it.

5 Great Food-Based Films

With the release of the animated comedy Sausage Party (definitely not for kids), film and food lover Harry Casey-Woodward discusses five movies based on things we love to eat.

Ratatouille (2007) 

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When I first saw this in the cinema, I thought this was one of Pixar’s best. The story is charming enough, with a rat fulfilling his dream to be a chef in one of the most esteemed restaurants in Paris. However, the film also invited us to share in his passion for food and cooking, even the simple dish of the title. Let’s just forget the fact that everyone in Paris has American accents.

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (2009) 

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I’m not a huge fan of this movie, but it’s such a celebration of our food lust I couldn’t afford to miss it off the list. An ambitious young scientist, trapped in a small town where all there is to eat is sardines, achieves surely everybody’s greatest wish and invents a machine that makes food rain from the sky. The film goes one step further, showing yet again how such a fantastic scientific achievement can get dangerous very quickly.

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) 

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In honour of the late, great Gene Wilder this musical chocolate banquet surely earns a place here. Based on one of Roald Dahl‘s most imaginative and celebrated children’s books, the film follows a little blond angel named Charlie who wins one of the fabled golden tickets to Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. Although I’m sickened slightly by the Americanised sappiness thrust into the story, the filmmakers did a great job of recreating Wonka’s factory with the finest of 70s effects, as well as keeping Dahl’s dark streak of humour intact.

Chocolat (2000) 

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Let’s keep up the literary-inspired choc fests shall we? Based on the novel by Joanne Harris, a mysterious woman arrives in a small French town during Lent and promptly sets up a chocolate shop. When she starts awakening the townspeoples’ repressed desires, this does not sit well with the local priest and he and the woman begin a battle of ideologies. This is an exploration of the emotional power of food and Johnny Depp is dishy as a guitar-playing gypsy pirate.

Delicatessen (1991)  

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Let’s stay in France, except we’ll travel into the future a bit. From visionary director Jean-Pierre Jeunet (Amelie, Alien: Resurrection) came this dystopian romantic comedy about an ex-circus performer moving into a flat. Unfortunately, in post-apocalyptic France food is scarce and the landlord, who happens to be a butcher, is eyeing up his tenant. But his daughter is nice. Cue a lot of comic action about human desperation for food, including some vegetarian revolutionaries.

Images from themovieman, amazon, space538.org, snoskred.org and fact.co.uk.

Five Best Disney Films

The new Jungle Book is out on DVD and Blu-Ray this week, so in celebration movie-consumer Harry Casey-Woodward is going to tell you his five favourite Disney films.

5. Pinocchio (1940) 

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This makes the list for being possibly the scariest Disney film. There’s child kidnappers, the most monstrous whale ever put on screen and one truly horrific scene where a boy transforms into a donkey. All this somehow went over my head when I was a kid. Maybe I was too distracted by the cricket.

4. The Jungle Book, (1967) 

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The one Disney film with jazz music! Sadly this was the last movie Mr. Disney produced while he was alive, but it was a genius stroke to mix Rudyard Kipling‘s story of a boy raised in the jungle by animals with foot-tappin’ tunes. I have yet to see the 2016 remake and in my opinion it’s going to be hard to beat this original feast of songs and great characters.

3. The Emperor’s New Groove (2000) 

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This film is a breath of fresh air in the Disney canon. It has one of the most original plots (an ancient emperor gets turned into a llama by the fiendish Yzma and the loveable Kronk, possibly the best villainous duo ever) and thus this is definitely the funniest and breeziest of the Disney animations. There’s also no forced songs or romance either, unless you count the growing bromance between the emperor and the peasant Pacha.

2. Finding Nemo (2003) 

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Pixar have surely saved Disney and this has to be their best effort. Inspired by the oceans’s beauty and variety of life, Pixar made a truly epic Odyssey that’s still funny and charming, of a clownfish facing down the dangers of the deep to find his son. I am just a little excited about Finding Dory.

1. The Lion King (1994) 

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Another nature-inspired epic, this time set on the African plains and with a more Shakespearean plot, where Simba the lion has to avenge his father’s death at the paws of his sly uncle Scar and fulfil his destiny as King of the pride. Why is this my favourite? Maybe I just like African wildlife, but everything about this film is damn near perfect: the songs, the animation, the equal amounts of humour and tragedy. There’s also hyenas, and Timon and Pumbaa. All together now, ‘hakuna matata…’.

Images from amazonplaybuzz.com, and movies.disney.com.au.

The Five Best Cats in Film

Hobbyist reviewer Harry Casey-Woodward compares some of the fluffiest, scratchiest performances in cinematic history….

Cats have dominated our media- acting cute and idiotic before cameras was surely a key part of their world invasion plan, and nowhere have they been more amusing and beguiling than on film. So here is a short list of the best cats to claw, spit and hiss their way across our screens. Possibly an idea for an Academy Award category?

5. The alley cat swingers from AristoCats, 1970

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It might not be correct to feature animated cats but I couldn’t pass off the most feline of all family films. This classic has a gallery of colourful cat characters, but the most enjoyable are the controversially named ‘swingers’ or alley cats, musical squatters who play raucous swing music in abandoned Paris buildings. Their most famous ditty is about how every individual desires to attain feline status. They may be threatening to the mouse character, one of them is a racist Asian stereotype and who knows what street crime they indulge in to fund their catnip habits. But dang, do they know how to have a good time.

4. The Siamese twins in Lady and the Tramp, 1955

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A couple more Disney characters in one of the studio’s most bizarre and racist scenes. In this canine romance, a dog hating old matron takes over Lady’s house and leaves a basket in the lounge. Out of it slither a perfectly choreographed pair of head-bobbing Siamese cats singing in high pitched Asian accents. In typical feline fashion, they go on to cause as much trouble as they can find, with Lady frantically chasing after them. They even manage to frame her for their mess. As fiendish as these negative racial stereotypes are, their song is still damn catchy years after viewing.

3. Spiteful farm cat in Babe, 1995

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An actually villainous cat this time, rather than just comically evil and none get more evil than the fluffy farm cat in Babe. She scratches our porky hero’s nose simply for trying to make friends with her. She’s put outside in the rain by the angry farmer, but she slips back in and at first appears to be kinder to Babe. Then she lets slip that people eat pigs, causing him to run away from the farm. Not only is her behaviour viciously spiteful for no reason, it also feels horribly cat-like. Plus she sounds like she’s voiced by some psychotic grandmother.

2. Mr. Tinkles from Cats & Dogs, 2001

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Everyone knows the white fluffy cat essential for the lap of every spy villain. But what if the cat was the villain? The result is horror and hilarity, as the power-hungry white fluffball in Cats & Dogs finds the megalomaniac image he wants to build for himself somewhat spoilt by his name: something his adoring nanny never refrains from reminding him of. Nevertheless, it is funny and scary to see the villain’s lapcat making ridiculously genius plans for world domination. Let’s not forget his most adorable and deadly henchman, the Russian kitty. There’s something unnerving about an armed kitten with a thick Russian accent who can cough up dog poo.

1. Yzma from Emperor’s New Groove, 2000

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Is Yzma, the power-hungry bad-tempered crone from Disney’s Inca comedy The Emperor’s New Groove, one of the best Disney villains ever? She gets even better at the end of the film, when she literally gets a taste of her own medicine and is transformed into a cute, cuddly cat by one of her potions. Turning into a fluffball does nothing to affect her diabolical personality (although she is disgusted at her new squeaky voice). It does, however, make hilarious viewing.

Images from disneywiki, cinemacats, TNTforum, saygoodbyetoto, and ohmydisney.

Artistic Disney Princesses

Artist jirka väätäinen has created images of how Disney Princesses would look in real life. Of course they are a beautiful reflection of patriarchal ideals.

Innocent and curious Alice

Whimsical and delicate Snow White

Jasmine has a Kim Kardashian look about her

Youthful and alluring siren of the sea Ariel

Fiercely sexual Pochantantis

And then there’s Ursula in all her villainous glory

 

Disney Princesses like you’ve never seen them before…

Canadian artist Sakimi Chan has given the classic Disney princesses a gender make-over turning the traditional feminine ladies into new masculine characters. Albeit it very beautiful, chiselled, hairless men.

Our favourite being the complete gender role reversal, with a masculine Belle and feminine Beast.

Images from Sakimi Chan’s Facebook