Tagged: tattoo

First Tattoo at 90

On her 90th birthday Grandma Heather Brooks from Canterbury got her first tattoo!

Heather chose a Cancer Research pink ribbon to signify her victory after a five year battle with cancer. Her two grandchildren are tattooed and persuaded her to commemorate her birthday with her very first tattoo.

It just seemed to me to be a fitting tribute to Cancer Research, who do such good work. I owe my life to them. I am also lucky to have an amazing family around me.

Images and quote from Kentonline.co.uk

Death Under Glass

Have you ever wondered what your tattoo looks like magnified? Have you found it hard to visualise where it sits in the layers of skin?

The Death Under Glass exhibition at The Mutter Musuem, Philadelphia, USA  is a collection of microscopic art has been created and curated by medical examiner Marianne Hamel, MD, PhD and forensic photographer Nikki Johnson. The photographs of magnified human tissue, have been taken post-mortem and are on show until the 16th December.

Red tattoo pigment 400x:

Do Not Resuscitate Tattoo

Nel Bolton, from The Hauge in the Netherlands, has had the words ‘Do Not Resuscitate me! I’m 91′ tattooed on her chest. She hopes that if she falls ill the doctors and her family will follow her wishes and respect her right to die.

In the Netherlands there is much debate concerning whether these types of tattoos are legally binding and also whether paramedics and other medical staff should follow the declaration.

Ms Bolton is not the first to have a tattoo of this sort, but her’s is the biggest. In 2011 Joy Tomkins had the statement tattooed on her chest in a bid to stop Doctors from reviving her.

 

 

Images from Daily Mail and Abroath

Can you be friends with your tattooist?

Can you ever truly be friend with your tattooist?

Sure, you probably would never have met outside of the tattoo studio and the only reason you have is because they can create something you want. But having met them, you may realise you have lots of stuff in common, that you make each other laugh, making the whole tattoo process more enjoyable.

You have singled them out for their drawing style, their colour palette or maybe on a recommendation. The evolving world of social media means that you can often view tattoos without ever seeing the person behind them. In simple terms your relationship with your tattooist is a business transaction, swapping a product or service for money.

But is money the means for a friendship to grow? Or can it be something that is problematic? If you are a loyal and regular customer to one tattooist should you get a discount or mate’s rates? Or like everyone else should you pay a fair price. What if you have something to exchange for a tattoo? Does the number of followers on your Instagram or blog have an affect on the price of your tattoo? Should the fact that you are inadvertently advertising the tattoo artists work when you post it count for something?

With large pieces comes longer time spans, more hours under the needle, more emails, more travel, more expense. You inevitably spend more time with the artist, you chat with them while you are in a vulnerable position, most likely undressed and in pain. What if your personalities clash and you realise that you really dislike the person? Or on the flip side you could become closer, realising that you not only love their work but also enjoy their company.

 

Tattoos by @jaketattoos & @karigrat

 

Want to frame your tattoos after you die? Now you can!

Peter van der Helm, owner of Walls and Skin a tattoo and graffiti studio in Amsterdam, is offering to preserve tattoos after the owner has died.

The Foundation for Art and Science of Tattooing has had over fifty people already signed up for their preservation service, in which they remove the tattooed skin, pack it in formaldehyde and send it to a laboratory where the water and fat will be removed and replaced with silicone. The tattooed skin will belong to the foundation, it can be put on display or loaned to friends and family of the deceased.

Prices start from 300 euros for a tattoo roughly 10cm in size. You can also buy gift vouchers and cards for the service.

The foundation wishes to collect different styles of tattoos from different artists, thus preserving the stories behind the tattoos. The main reasons for tattoo preservation as stated on their website include:

 the emotional values of the tattoos, the interest in contributing to the history of tattooing, the preservation of the art piece or the artist work and to leave behind a piece of yourself to friends and family father death. 

Image from Tattwords

 

 

Tattoo advice for first timers

We’ve put our heads together here at Things&Ink to bring you a post filled with tattoo advice for those who are yet to go under the needle…

Get quality not quantity!

 

Jen Adamson our Music Writer says: “Get quality not quantity!” Jen has learnt from her own mistakes of being covered with awful tattoos when she was younger! You get what you pay for! (she is also going through a painful removal process, read more here)

 

Know your body and its limits. Don’t over push them.

 

Writer Kimberly Baltzer-Jaray has a multitude of great advice to impart, she really knows her stuff: Do your research before getting one. Know everything about the process of getting a tattoo, understand the equipment, have an idea of the health and safety standards, etc. If you walk into a shop and you see anything wrong, leave immediately.
Always look at a portfolio of both fresh and healed work. Wet, fresh, swollen tattoos often look so great, but it’s after the peeling and healing that you see if the lines are straight, or if the colours took, or if the drawing is good.
Be sure you fully hydrate and eat a good meal before sitting down. Bring drinks with you and don’t be afraid to ask for a pause to sip. Also, sometimes if you are getting a back piece done or something on a painful area it helps to bring along a sweatshirt or something from home that you can put your face on or into when it gets a bit tough.
The tattoo shop comfort is as important as the artist. Be sure when you’re looking around that you actually go to these places, don’t just look online. Go in and check the place out, does it feel right for you? (e.g., are there private rooms or are you out in the open, does the artist allow people to hang around him or her while working, are there comfortable chairs or tables). Talk to the artist and the staff and make sure you are comfortable with them. After all the artist is going to be touching you, and you have to be able to tell him/her if you are struggling, or might faint etc., The shop needs to be a place where you aren’t afraid if the worst happens – it needs to be a place that if something happened like fainting or puking you’d feel confident that you’d be taken care of properly and be okay. Know your body and its limits. Don’t over push them.

 

You don’t need to be able to draw, a good artist will do this for you

 

Our editorial assistant Rosalie Woodward says: You don’t need to be able to draw, a good artist will do this for you, but it helps to go with an idea of size and what you would like. I always try to give the artist as much free rein as I can, I think you come away with a better tattoo. I have a lot of tattoos that have no meaning, I simply liked the artwork and this is fine! You don’t need a story behind every one! While it heals it will itch! So infuriating but don’t give in and scratch it and don’t pick at your healing tattoo, this will peel off the ink and ruin it!

 

Keely Reichardt Stick to your guns and be confident in choice of sizing and design!

 

Make-up artist and homewares writer Keely Reichardt has this pearl of wisdon: If you really are not sure whether you want to go bigger or not, then do not be bullied into getting a tattoo much bigger than you first thought. Stick to your guns and be confident in choice of sizing and design!

Look beyond photographs of other tattoos that belong to other people in your search for inspiration.

 

Editor Alice Snape has this advice: Look beyond photographs of other tattoos that belong to other people in your search for inspiration. Think about the artists you love – the pictures that hang on your walls – favourite books, characters from films and just look around your home at the things that surround you. Then pick a tattooist whose style you are drawn to – whether its their colour palette, or bold lines. If you go with them with an abstract idea and some references, they will be able to create something just for you a custom, unique piece. Just don’t let them persuade you too go too big, or have it somewhere you are not happy with.

 

We hope this helps… good luck and remember to share your tattoo journeys with us, hello@thingsandink.com, @thingsandink, facebook.com/thingsandink.

Vagabond Tattoo Studio

Vagabond custom tattoo studio in Hackney London, is born from the collaboration of tattoo artist Paul Hill and graphic designer Rebecca Morris.

The studio’s aesthetic is heavily influenced by Rebecca’s design background, the modern and stripped back decor creates a crisp and clean space, perfect for showcasing the tattoo artists’ work.

Paul’s artwork stems from a background in custom car air-brushing and pin-striping, a creative and skilled art form which allowed him to naturally progress into tattooing. The shop houses a custom built motorbike, a throwback to Paul’s air-brushing days.

From working in busy walk-in studios, Paul has developed a clean and crisp tattoo technique visible in his graphic style. He revels in bolder, moody looking tattoos which re-imagine traditional flash.

 

The shop is also home to tattoo artists: Harry Harvey who excels in traditional and old-school tattooing and Andrew Hulbert who predominately works in an illustrative style with black line work.

 The five-strong team welcome anyone to pop into the shop to discuss tattoo ideas or gallery exhibitions.

Follow Vagabond on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to see more tattoos by the artists.

 

Miniature Ink Sneak Peek

To celebrate our two year anniversary we are teaming up with Atomica Gallery to bring you Miniature Ink. An exhibition featuring miniature original artwork from over 100 tattoo artists across the globe. All of the pieces will be on sale for £60, with profits being donated to cancer charity Sarcoma UK.

The exhibition opens on Wednesday 24th September and the party starts at 6pm, all artwork will be sold on a first come, first served basis! So make sure you’re there on time to grab an original from your favourite artist…

Here’s a sneak peek from a few tattoo artists who have created art for ‘Miniature Ink’.

Hannah Willison

Alexandra Wilkey 

Ael Lim

Drew Linden

Tracy D

Kelly McGrath

Juliet 

Abbie Williams

Eddy-Lou

 

Meet Jay Freestyle

Jay Freestyle is a 29-year-old tattoo artist and painter working at Dermadonna Custom Tattoos in Amsterdam. Originally born in South Africa and raised in a conservative Chinese family, Jay Freestyle was forced to immigrate to Europe, over ten years ago, due to the lack of any real creative scene in Johannesburg. His style is one-of-a-kind, incredibly unique and mind-blowing…

We caught up with Jay to find out more.

How did you get into tattooing? I started off as a piercer and my mentor was the one to actually push me to learn tattooing. I started practising on artificial skin for a couple of months and once I felt confident I moved onto friends and co-workers. I had a lot of work done on myself by professionals and that was one of the main ways I learnt and got into the trade.

How would you describe your style? Sometimes when people try to explain or describe my style they, for a lack of better words call it “Jay Style”, which I kind of like. It’s Jaystyle, it’s whatever I want it to be.

How do you like to work with your clients? I like it when they have a basic idea of what they want in terms of subject matter and they just let me run with it. It is a fine line between giving enough input to get a feel of their personality and what they want and not so much as to ruin the creative process.

What kind of ideas do they come to you with? It varies, the most common requests I get are for flowers and animals/birds. A lot of ideas that people come up with are mostly to do with some sort of “happy” feeling. I rarely get to do morbid stuff unfortunately.

Jay Freestyle is your name, does that sum up your style of tattooing? Yes it does.

Are your customers often surprised by what you come up with for them? Yes and no. Those that are fans of my work and understand what I do aren’t that surprised because they know what they’re getting into and already have a certain expectation. Collectors that I have to convince into sharing my vision are the ones that come out surprised.

Do you just tattoo straight onto the body? No stencils or anything pre-drawn? I draw directly onto the body, the basic composition and whatever I feel I need to have as reference. I, of course, also use stencils, not everything can be hand drawn. I don’t however have anything pre-drawn, so the entire design process is done spontaneously (free-styled).

 

What do you enjoy most about tattooing? Everything. The art of it, travelling, the lifestyle. One of the most valued things I’ve gained from tattooing are the friends I’ve made over the years. I would have never met these people that changed my life if I wasn’t a tattoo artist.